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Career Clock (wage earners)

Understanding where you are in the arc of your career or project is important to determining your aptitude for risk or earnings (two different things):

1. Your value as an employee

2. Your preparedness for risk as a business owner

I developed this illustration as an answer to frequent clients that are starting their first business. 

I work with many career employees who are making their first risk in business (inventors, artists, startups, technology, etc…).  After years of working for someone else they are ready to strike out on their own.  Many, however, don’t truly appreciate how insulated their life has been as an employee.  Employee positions do not involve any personal risk (one is simply trading time, talent and responsibility for a given wage).   It may be worth discussion, but if you are considering self-employment or business ownership it is a good place to start. 

If you are already an owner (or self-employed…and there is a difference), this illustration may turn your wheels a little about where your value is in a business (and what other talent you may need to surround yourself with, in order to be most profitable).  This is titled “Wage Earner’s Career Clock” for a reason (owners don’t typically derive their income from a wage; earnings and wages being two distinct things).

In this illustration, MONEY exists outside the circle.  Getting to the money requires four things:

  • Time
  • Talent
  • Responsibility
  • Risk

MEINC_CareerClock1 (printable PDF)

“Wing Theory” for Business

…so I was sitting around the other night, thinking about how business navigates the marketplace…and how the market may or may not actually respond as much like a fluid as many market professionals would like to believe.  If it were a fluid…[insert idea].

It occurred to me that Bernoulli’s principle is simply a scientific statement of how fluid reacts (pressure, speed, distance)…and that science is applied with great success for many innovations (not the least of which is an airplane wing).  There you have it:

WING THEORY for Business (TM) – utilizing Bernoulli’s principle as a creative basis to determine strategic modeling for business, where the market is a fluid.  Designing to gain altitude/distance or less pressure in business as a result of an efficient design.

I decided to diagram my thoughts as it relates to “altitude” in business.  A wing is for flight, right?  Let’s give your business wings.

I’ve attached a PDF for the curious and included preview images.

Bernoulli For Business (“Wing Theory” pdf)

 

 

 

In short – the innovative element of modeling a business in this manner is that it places a hierarchy on management, while also labeling (and illustrating) the most important component of a business (the “high spot”).  That “most important thing” is different in EVERY company (something that conventional business modeling doesn’t allow for as efficiently in visual depictions).

The tallest column in the structure of a wing determines both the radius of the wing and the potential for “lift”.  It illustrates a requirement for all the supporting/surrounding elements – what relevance they play in giving a business the shape necessary for strategic “lift”.  Weaknesses in a business model are more visually identifiable as well.

There is way more to it than that, but this 4 page illustration very clearly communicates the broad strokes of adapting conventional business designs, while treating the 21st century marketplace as it should be interpreted (a fluid that can be navigated with the right design).

It isn’t science as much as it is a really just a clever/visual analogy.  In any case, this depiction allows for the most simplistic illustration of three simultaneous components (all of which are sometimes difficult to communicate on their own, let alone together):

  1. linear hierarchy (business processes)
  2. business philosophy (brand & market focus)
  3. management strategy (strengths are strengths)

Enjoy,

Mark

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By · April 23, 2011 · Filed in Art & Artists, Education, Marketing, News & Thoughts · Enter your password to view comments.

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By · February 25, 2011 · Filed in Education, News & Thoughts · Enter your password to view comments.

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